Skills of 2018: January Report

Today marks the beginning of a new month, and with it comes a new “Skill of 2018”. But before I delve into the complexities of solving a Rubik’s cube in under 30 seconds, or finally bunker down and get started on my Mandarin, it’s time to tell you of my ability to whistle. Rather than write a blurb about my successes and failures, here’s a video to show my current ability. (For those wondering, the backdrop is for the students I tutor online).

While I technically did “learn” how to whistle, I definitely have a ways to go before I can do it consistently or with more variety. I’ll mark January’s challenge as a partial success, which I think is fair considering I only had half the month to work on it.

Now it’s onward to solving this Rubik’s “Speed” Cube without deconstructing it.

Feature image by Pexels
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How to Make a New Year’s Resolution

Whenever New Year’s is around the corner you start to see posts about resolutions left, right, and centre. They are unavoidable and often the same thing every year.  For those that participate, here is a way to rethink your resolution and make it into something you won’t forget after a week. For those who don’t, here is my personal version of New Year’s resolutions that won’t make you block me on Facebook.

Tangible/Measurable: It needs to have a clear meaning. You can’t simply say “work harder” because you can constantly change the meaning of that resolution as the year goes by and it is highly subjective. Additionally, you shouldn’t try to pile on a ton of things, like “work harder, lose weight, eat healthy everyday, and run a marathon a month” – you’ll end up feeling overwhelmed and giving up on one or all of these. On the other hand something like, “Always get my work done before watching Netflix” can be understood by and applied to anyone.

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Achievable: While something like “Go to the gym every day” might sound nice, it is more than likely very unrealistic. Chances are you’ll have a day here and there where you simply cannot bring yourself to go or feel sick. After a day like that, your resolution will be “broken” and your resolve with it. Gyms’ populations spike in January then quickly drop as people come to this realization. Instead, you might make a resolution like, “Go to the gym at least 4 days a week”.

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Fun and Personal: Too often you hear the same boring new year’s resolutions that make you want to roll your eyes and even avoid the person for a bit. With the social pressures and general lack of creativity surrounding resolutions, it’s easy to fall into the trap of “I’ll go to the gym everyday” or “I’ll become a better student”. But if you take the time to come up with something that’s more creative and a lot more personal, then not only will you enjoy sharing it more with other people, you’re also more likely to follow it. As a writer and inconsistent blogger, I might make mine, “Write biweekly blog posts, even if they are 200 words or less”.

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Sample Resolutions: If you’re still having trouble coming up with ideas, here are some of mine from previous years and others I have come up with for your benefit:

  • Stop having snacks between meals/only eat 3 times a day
  • Lose 20 pounds by the end of the year
  • Drink no more than twice a week/Only drink when with friends
  • Whenever physically able, take a daily walk (any length)
  • Stop buying snacks from vending machines/only eat snacks from home
  • Only have dessert once/twice per week
  • Call/visit parents at least once a week
  • Read two books a month
  • Meditate before bed for at least a minute
  • Go on a weekly adventure (of any kind or length)
  • Attend one more/less social event than usual every month
  • Do something fun every week

Travel Blog #8: Hiroshima in Photos

“I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds” – J. Robert Oppenheimer
View from Hiroshima station, modern day.
A tricycle hit by the nuclear blast.
A plaque urges “No more Hiroshimas”.
A map shows the aftereffects of nuclear testing in the USA.
Cenotaph for the atomic bomb victims.
Monument to the Korean victims of the bomb.
Atomic Bomb Memorial Mound – herein lay the ashes of tens of thousands of the bomb’s victims.
Bell of Peace – ringing to call an end to nuclear war.
Atomic Bomb Dome – formerly the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall. Hundreds of people within were instantly killed by the nuclear blast.
Now listed as a World Heritage Site, the dome was once called for removal due to the sad reminder it brings.
The world’s first atomic bomb was detonated 600m above this spot.
The view straight up from the former hypocenter of the nuclear blast.
Shukkeien garden – originally constructed in 1620, rebuilt in 1951 after the war.
A view of the garden’s rainbow bridge.
The beautiful garden attracts many tourists.
Much of the garden can be seen from this spot.
A tea garden – restored in 1963.
Several small islands can be found in the main pond.
Thin stone bridges help with crossing from one area to the next.
Today, skyscrapers dot the backdrop of the Shukkeien garden.